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HOW TO EAT AN ORANGE

DEVELOPMENT HISTORY

Cast: 1 woman

Based on the writing of Claudia Bernardi

Commissioned by INTAR Theatre, New York, NY

World Premiere at La MaMa Downstairs Theatre, NY

Virtual workshop with INTAR and CultureHub

SYNOPSIS

A new one-woman play about the visual artist and activist Claudia Bernardi, her childhood in Argentina under the military junta, and her subsequent work digging up the past. For the past three decades, Catherine Filloux, French Algerian American award-winning playwright and librettist has traveled to conflict areas writing plays addressing human rights. 

PRESS FOR HOW TO EAT AN ORANGE

“Powerful and poetic, How To Eat an Orange demonstrates not only how our histories haunt us, like the lingering scent of fruit or flowers, and how that haunting testifies to the contingency of our existences – and, more specifically, to how flimsy the barriers to state-sponsored violence actually are, no matter how secure we perceive ourselves to be – but also that it is never too late to seek justice and, as importantly, to bear witness.”

John R. Ziegler and Leah Richards, Thinking Theater NYC,

New York City's off-Broadway and independent theater scene, June 3, 2024

‘How To Eat an Orange’ by Catherine Filloux is an intimate, soaring one-woman show…Watching this show was an incredibly moving experience - and evoked many more emotions than I even expected going in.”

Review by Niranjani Reddi

Published by Theatre Beyond Broadway, June 4, 2024

“The slow burn of How to Eat an Orange demands the viewer’s patience, but the piece also refuses to be taken in isolation. As our culture of instant gratification increasingly infiltrates the performance ecosystem, I appreciate a play that lingers with me, its resonance deepening as I think about it. The most trenchant moments in Filloux’s play serve as a reminder of the basic human instinct toward creation as a response to the ineffable and unconscionable. And that, to remain hopeful yet rigorous in the vitality of art is itself a resistance against authoritarianism, which, across time and space, has relied upon the silence of artists.”

Review by Miranda Jackel. Published by Forward, June 6, 2024

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